Judicial review in English law

Judicial review is a procedure in English administrative law by which the courts in England and Wales supervise the exercise of public power on the application of an individual. A person who feels that an exercise of such power by a government authority, such as a minister, the local council or a statutory tribunal, is unlawful, perhaps because it has violated his or her rights, may apply to the Administrative Court (a division of the High Court) for judicial review of the decision and have it set aside (quashed) and possibly obtain damages. A court may also make mandatory orders or injunctions to compel the authority to do its duty or to stop it from acting illegally.

Now Mr. Olivier is saying the proceedings started by the Baylis family’s legal representitives is a waste of the UK court’s time.

It is more a case of Mr. Olivier know they break the law and that a review will point that out.

 

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